Sublime Horror

Celebrating the best in horror

Author: Peter Meinertzhagen (page 1 of 6)

Swallow review – a disturbing psychological case study of a woman who tries to regain control ⭑⭑⭑⭑⭑

Horror can be a phenomenally surprising genre. For every handful of unimaginative paint-by-numbers slashers, there comes a film genuinely distinctive and unforgettable. Swallow, the debut feature of director Carlo Mirabella-Davis, is one of those films.

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Latest horror books: November 2019

We’re cheating slightly this month by starting off with four books released not in November but on Halloween, which is close enough for us and it’d be a real shame not to highlight them. Blame publishers for thinking 31 October is a great date to release books. As always, this is not an exhaustive list. If you think there’s a book we’ve caused grave injustice to by leaving off, leave a comment or get in touch.

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Andrew Michael Hurley interview: ‘Folk horror debunks the idea that England is a green and pleasant land’

Andrew Michael Hurley’s superb Starve Acre ends his folk horror trilogy of novels exploring the eeriness of the rural landscapes that Hurley has immersed his fiction in since his debut The Loney was published in 2014. In this interview, I speak to Hurley about Starve Acre, genre boundaries, 70s British folk horror, and moving from the rural to the urban in his next novel.

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Into Bones like Oil by Kaaron Warren review – doctored sleep

Into Bones like Oil is the new novella by Australian Shirley Jackson Award-winner Kaaron Warren, and it warns of the danger of wishing ill on others (lest you wear your curse as a garment, as the psalm goes) and your guilt will haunt you like ghosts.

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Women’s Weird: Strange Stories by Women review – filling a gap in the weird fiction bookshelf

Weird fiction, a literary mode defined by Lovecraft as possessing “a certain atmosphere of breathless and unexplainable dread of outer, unknown forces”, is usually spoken about in the same sentence as names such as Algernon Blackwood, Arthur Machen, William Hope Hodgson, M.R. James, and, of course, H.P. Lovecraft. Unlike the earlier and related genre, the gothic, the names of women very rarely turn up in discussions of weird fiction, unless when referring to writers who came later in its development, from the 1950s onward. And even then, far too little. It’s high time, therefore, for the release of this new collection of short stories from Handheld Press, edited by expert on women’s supernatural fiction, Melissa Edmundson, whom Sublime Horror readers might remember from Avenging Angels and her reading list of ghost stories by Victorian women.

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Japanese Ghost Stories by Lafcadio Hearn (Penguin Classics) review – fears reborn, nightmares reincarnated

Born in Greece, raised in Ireland, educated in England, and a writing career forged in America – perhaps it is Lafcadio Hearn’s lack of a permanent home that resulted in his openness towards and interest in other cultures. If we look back on Hearn’s career and works, it is a recording of folklore and local customs that stands out most clearly.

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David Weiner: ‘These movies are like odd little children that you feel the need to protect’

In Search of Darkness, now available to pre-order, is a documentary love letter to American 80s horror films. It examines the films of each year consecutively, interweaving them with discussions on different topics, from special effects to the decade’s iconic women of horror. You can read what I thought in my review. David Weiner is the writer and director of In Search of Darkness and, with excitement and press coverage ramping up, we had a chat about the film’s making.

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Julia Armfield: ‘salt slow is about women and bodies and the ways in which our bodies contain us and betray us’

This interview is also available as an exclusive supporter-only podcast – become a supporter on Patreon

Julia Armfield’s short story collection salt slow opens with “Mantis”, a story about a teenage girl whose body is changing. But unlike her peers’, her body is changing in a more unexpected, more monstrous way.

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Catriona Ward’s Little Eve wins Best Horror Novel at British Fantasy Awards 2019

A huge congratulations to Catriona Ward whose novel Little Eve won Best Horror Novel at the British Fantasy Awards, presented today at FantasyCon 2019 in Glasgow. Little Eve is a 1920s murder mystery set on a remote Scottish island within a nature-worshipping cult and is one of our favourite horror novels of the last couple of years.

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Worse Than Death review – a school reunion gone very bloodily wrong

Worse Than Death is the new game from Canadian indie developer Benjamin Rivers – a short horror adventure about a school reunion gone very bloodily wrong.

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