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Book reviews Books Fiction

A Lush and Seething Hell by John Hornor Jacobs review – two novellas of lush, haunting prose

A Lush and Seething Hell brings together – in The Sea Dreams It Is The Sky and My Heart Struck Sorrow – two very different novellas located within the “found history” tradition.

“I am fucking jealous as fuck of John Hornor Jacobs” – Chuck Wendig, foreword

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TV

How American Horror Story brought queer representation to the forefront of TV

American Horror Story has graced our screens for the better part of a decade. While the anthology series has been experimental in nature, it has been instrumental in bringing queer representation to the forefront of mainstream TV (Reynolds, D. 2016). However, while forward with the aforementioned queer representation through characterisation, American Horror Story also has an underlying metaphorical storyline for homosexuality that some may not recognise.

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Book reviews Books Fiction

The House on the Lake by Nuala Ellwood review – gripping and dark, but with a glimmer of hope

The House on the Lake opens with an anonymous narrator reflecting on the loss of all she ever wanted. “Love. Family. Home.” The reader has no idea how she has fallen into this dire situation but something terrible has happened. There is blood in the snow and the police are breaking down the door.

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Book reviews Books Non-fiction

Gothic Remixed by Megen de Bruin-Molé review – an enlightening examination of Frankenfictions

We live in a time of remixes. Arguably, we live in a time that is itself a remix. Culture, history and politics all seem to repeat themselves, changed only slightly from one iteration to the next, with increasing rapidity. Whether it’s blockbuster movie sagas or wars in the Middle East, everything seems unpleasantly familiar.

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Reviews TV

BBC’s Dracula review – a disappointing & preposterous pastiche

(Editor’s note: this review contains spoilers)

When considering an adaptation of a novel, we must first remember that it is always exactly that – an adaptation. We cannot expect to see an exact rendering of our own analysis of any text onscreen; any adaptation requires careful editing, curating and collaborative interpretation from the actors, writers, directors, set designers and everyone else involved. Writers particularly should always feel free to be creative with a text; too much adherence to the original means you end up with Stephen King’s awful film rendering of The Shining, instead of Stanley Kubrick’s masterpiece.

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Book reviews Books Fiction

The Other People by C. J. Tudor review – a tightly-paced and gripping crime thriller-horror hybrid

C.J. Tudor has garnered a shining reputation as a prolific author of psychological thrillers, gaining praise from author heavyweights such as Stephen King and Lee Child. The Other People was my first introduction to C.J. Tudor’s work, after hearing her on a panel speaking passionately about the audiobook adaptations of her previous two novels, The Taking of Annie Thorne (2019) and The Chalk Man (2018).